Jmp cs!

Junior Mathematicians, Programmers and Computer Scientists

 

Bringing Programming to the Classroom

Junior Mathematicians, Programmers and Computer Scientists, or Jmp CSers, are students who have sought the know-how to compete in the knowledge economy, but have not found the 21st century computer science education they need to either compete in the private sector or begin a four-year computer science bachelor's program. With roughly 150,000 Boston-area tech sector employees, Jmp CS seeks to connect students in urban public schools with professionals attuned to the industry's demands.  

Jmp CS's initiative is to provide outside professionals with access to a classroom and students interested in pursuing a start-up or tech sector career. The plan consists of a four week crash course in what programming is, and how students can make it relevant to their individual goals. Eventually, Jmp CS will provide computer science curriculum to teachers interested in instructing an up-to-date class as well as establishing connections with tech sector industries for summer youth employment opportunities.

 

Founded

2015

Location

Boston, MA

Projects

Introduction to Programming

Logic

Python

 

"Humans are allergic to change. They love to say, 'We've always done it this way.' I try to fight that. That's why I have a clock on my wall that runs counter-clockwise."

-Grace Hopper

About Jmp CS

The notion is simple: professionals trained in the field volunteer to enter the classroom one hour per week as part of an after school program for one month. A lesson plan will be provided, and students will be given projects to be overseen by the volunteer. A pledge of four hours is all we need.

Though the time commitment is short, the resources and knowledge provided to our students will last a lifetime.

 

 

It has been estimated that by 2025 nearly 500,000 jobs will require some level of computer science education nationwide. Presently, the Boston metropolitan area is second in the nation (behind only Silicon Valley) in tech sector jobs, which accounts for one of the region's highest paying and most economically stable professions. Yet despite the clear need and demand for computer science education, the resources remain unavailable. In addition, schools often lack the ability to attract technology instructors who can teach the information that the industry demands as teaching salaries remain noncompetitive to those in the private sector.

In the new economy, computer science isn't an optional skill - it's a basic skill...Yet right now, only about a quarter of our K through 12 schools offer computer science.

-President Barack Obama, January 2016

HIGH SCHOOLS IN MASSACHUSETTS

378

NUMBER OF MASS. HIGH SCHOOLS OFFERING COMPUTER SCIENCE CLASSES

23

OPEN TECH SECTOR JOBS PER BOSTON AREA COMPUTER SCIENCE GRADUATE

17

The Team

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Cory O'Hayer is a guidance counselor at Another Course to College, an inclusion high school in the Boston Public Schools. He spent three years as a counselor at a technology summer camp in Milton, Massachusetts and holds a master's degree in urban education policy from Brown University. He has previously worked at Madison Park Technical Vocational High School, Snowden International, Burke High School, and Brighton High School.

 

CODE TRAINER

Herman Saksono is a computer science PhD student at Northeastern and a native of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. A strong believer in bringing out the human side of computing, Herman created a website designed to help citizens monitor the 2014 Indonesian Presidential election results. His research in Boston focuses on how to design technology that supports health and wellbeing among individuals and communities. Herman has collaborated with the Boston Center for Youth and Families as well as the Boston Area Health Education Center in projects ranging from teen empowerment to physical activity.

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Grant writer

Ella Weber is a curatorial and research assistant at the Harvard University Herbaria working on a project to improve the research potential of the New England collection by creating open-access digital records and photographs. She holds a bachelor's degree in American history and cultural anthropology from the University of Michigan, and is interested in expanding the relevancy and audience of historical collections through modern technology.